Escondido Fire Department Jr. Firefighter's Safety School

  Learn Not To Burn® Preschool Program

          Pre-School & Kindergarten-Lesson Plans & Activities

 

 

             Lesson Plan: Smoke Alarms, Get Out and Stay Out

 Most likely, young children won’t be home alone and if a smoke alarm sounds, parents or caregivers will assist them, especially while escaping the home under fire conditions. In most cases, children will not have to get out on their own. However, it is important that the child knows what to do and where to go in case the child becomes separated from the caregiver or the caregiver is unable to get to the child.

Understand the proper reactions to a sounding smoke alarm - children must understand that when a smoke alarm sounds or “beeps” and there is smoke or fire, they should go outside immediately with the rest of their family. There is no time to stop for toys, pets, or other things. Young children are often frightened by strange, loud noises. They may freeze, hide, or make other inappropriate responses that could endanger their safety. It is important that children be­come familiar with the sound of a smoke alarm and know what to do when they hear it.

This lesson plan will help teach kids the appropriate behavior should they hear a smoke alarm.  MP3 files of sounds to help children recognize the smoke alarm sound, photos of objects that make sounds. Also included are colored illustrations for discussion, coloring pages, and a letter to send home to parents and guardians. Below are the sound files that go with this lesson plan.

Smoke Alarm

Baby Crying

                                               Dog Barking

                                               Car Horn

                                               Fire Truck

                  

 

    Lesson Plan: Stay Away from Hot Things that Can Hurt You!

This lesson teaches young children that hot things can hurt them and not to touch hot things. For this lesson, “hot things” include things that may not be hot right now but can get hot, such as a cooking pot, a lighter, a toaster, or a curling iron.

Child care centers and people’s homes may have things that can burn young children. Children can be burned from touching hot things, such as a pan on the stove or a curling iron, and from hot liquids, such as a cup of tea or bath water. Matches and lighters can also get hot. Teach children to stay away from matches and lighters and to tell a grown up if they see these items. Young children playing with matches and lighters cause many fires, deaths and injuries each year. Below is the file for the optional song and poster that goes with this lesson plan.

 

“Cool It, Hot Things Can Hurt You”

                                                         Hot Things Picture Posters